Current Weather

Currently on MIX 106.5

Footloose
Kenny Loggins

CURRENTLY ON KiX 100.3

Dirt Road Anthem
Jason Aldean

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey warns of ‘historic’ flooding with Hurricane Sally

SHARE NOW

MOBILE, Ala.- Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey was joined by weather and emergency officials at a press conference today warning that, although Hurricane Sally may not have the destructive winds of other storms to hit the state’s Gulf Coast, the dangers posed by heavy rains and storm surge could be unlike anything seen in our lifetime.

“We are looking at record flooding – perhaps breaking historic levels – and with rising water comes a greater risk for loss of property and life,” she said. “Sally has the potential to inflict major damage along our Gulf Coast and even further northward as it moves.”

Ivey was joined by Alabama Emergency Management Agency Director Brian Hastings and John De Block, warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service. Both shared the governor’s concern for flooding.

“Sally is shaping up to be a very dangerous and historic flooding event from the coastal counties along I-65 and the I-85 corridors,” Hastings said. “If you are in a low-lying area or a flood-prone area, get to a safer place and higher ground now before you see impacts.”

Ivey has authorized the activation of some Alabama National Guard units, and Hastings said high water evacuation teams are activated in Mobile and Baldwin counties.

In addition, Hastings said mutual assistance swift-water rescue teams are on alert and FEMA and other partners have already offered search and rescue assistance if needed.

Hastings said there are two shelters open in Mobile County with one on standby and one shelter open in Baldwin County.

Though Hurricane Sally has weakened from a Category 2 to a Category 1 storm, De Block said storm surge and heavy rains remain a dangerous mix.

“Record flooding is very well possible in Mobile and Baldwin county areas – 10-15 inches of rainfall, locally higher amounts,” De Block said. “Combined with the storm surge will make drainage a challenge so any water that falls is going to be really prohibited from going downstream as fast as it normally would.”

 


Click here to e-mail the reporter.© 2016-2023, SylacaugaNews.com/Marble City Media LLC/RadioAlabama. All Rights Reserved. RadioAlabama’s network -- MIX 106.5 (& 98.3 HD2), WSGN, KiX 100.3 (& 1290 AM), 105.1 WRFS, KiX 96.3 (& 1050 AM), RadioAlabama Sports, and RA Digital -- along with SylacaugaNews.com reports local news around the clock and will keep you up-to-date during breaking news and weather. For real-time alerts from SylacaugaNews.com, text NEWS to 59925. Standard text message rates may apply. By signing up, you agree to receive ongoing text message alerts from RadioAlabama. Consent not required for purchase. Up to eight messages per month. Reply STOP to cancel. Reply HELP for help. Message & Data rates may apply. Terms and Conditions/Privacy Policy @ www.optspot.com/tnc.